1. CLASS OVERVIEW
    A.)  Let’s chat! -B.) SCHEDULE / PRODUCING 2/ FINAL FILM PRODUCTION
    C.)  CANVAS/ASSESSMENTS!
    D.) REVISION OF PRODUCING 1
    E.) RULES OF THUMB OF PRODUCING
    F.) TOPIC 1
    G.) FOLLOWING CLASSESKEY TENTATIVE DATES:—SHOOTING BLOCK – FEB 22ND – APRIL 4TH – 6 WEEKS
    Bring back gear 72 hours
    DELIVERY DATE – JUNE 9 TH COLOUR GRADED/MIXED FILM DELIVERED TO —–DESIRED SPECS
    PRIVATE PREMIERE – AFTER JUNE

    REVISION QUESTIONS. 

    2. BROAD QUESTIONS ON PRODUCING:

    0. Are you a filmmaker? Or a crew member? 
    1. What are you making ? 
    2. Who you are making it for? (Back in the 70s you made it first then found your audience! Now it’s the other way around). 
    3. Why are you making it? 
    4. Where will it be shown Broadcast/Cinema/Online/VOD?
    5. What’s in it for the audience? 
    6. How can I develop this idea?
    7. What funding options are open to me? 
    8. What do I currently have access to? Locations, contacts, individuals.
    9. What are my goals for 1 year, 3 years, 5 years etc.
    10. What do I need to achieve to get there?
    11. What networks do I have already?
    12. What is my marketing plan?
    13. What promotional activities do I need to do?

    3. HOW SHOULD I MAKE MY MOVIE?

    1. Should I write my script and avoid funding opportunities?
    2. Should I write my treatment, spec and coverage before seeking funding/feedback?

4. RULES OF THUMB TO MAKE YOU INTO A BADA$$ PRODUCER

A.) GOOD/ FAST/ CHEAP 

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SOURCE: http://www.pyragraph.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/04/GOOD-FAST-CHEAP.jpg

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B.) NOTHING IS SACRED / SEPARATE YOURSELF FROM YOUR WORK 

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C.) GET YOUR SCRIPT/COVERAGE READ/RE-READ.

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D.) BRICOLAGE – (in art or literature) construction or creation from a diverse range of available things. Macgyver is the best example of this! A television series in which the protagonist is the paragon of a bricoleur,[21] creating solutions for the problem to be solved out of immediately available found objects.

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E.) PREPARATION, PREPARATION 

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SOURCE: https://www.morganmckinley.com.au/article/interview-preparation-tips-strategy-professionals

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F.) LEARN THE RULES, BREAK THEM

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G.) KNOW HOW TO APPROACH THE RIGHT CREW MEMBER AND WHEN/WHERE

TOPIC 1: WHO IS A PRODUCER

LINE PRODUCER: Typically, a Line Producer manages the budget of a motion picture. Alternatively, or in addition, they may manage the day to day physical aspects of the film production, serving a role similar to the unit production manager.
ASSOCIATE PRODUCER: Associate Producers take on responsibilities delegated to them by the Producer.
SUPERVISING PRODUCER: A Supervising Producer supervises one or more producers in the performance of some or all of his/her/their producer functions, on single or multiple productions, either in place of, or subject to the overriding authority of an executive producer.
EXECUTIVE PRODUCER: An executive producer (EP) enables the making of a commercial entertainment product. The EP may be concerned with management accounting and/or with associated legal issues (like copyrights or royalties). An EP generally contributes to the film’s budget and may or may not work on set.
PRODUCTION MANAGER: Production Managers organize the business, finance and employment issues in film and television productions. As a Production Manager, you would be in charge of how the production budget is spent and making sure that everything runs smoothly during filming.

 ADDITION 1: PRODUCING TIPS FROM THE CANNES FILM FESTIVAL. 

  1. Learn how to collaborate.
    2. Form an international collective.
    3. Work the subsidies
    4. Don’t chase subsidies.
    5. Think 20%. More than one production and financing company told me that they like to bring between 15 and 20% equity to their projects — generally films with high seven and low-eight figure budgets with name actors attached. The rest of the budget they like to cover through pre-sales (not the whole world) and soft money. If the above formula doesn’t add up to the project’s budget, something is off about the project.
    6. Ignore China – 
    Even with projects with Chinese content, it can be hard for outside independent companies to vet co-production partners, and hard to get the SARFT certificate allowing a film to qualify as a local production and thus escape exhibition quotas
    7. Chase China
    8. Be cognizant of the budget.
    9. Don’t focus on the budget. “Don’t pitch your budget, pitch your story,”
    10. Figure out your bridge financing
    11. If you can’t do it right, do it wrong.
    As a cinematographer, Blue Ruin’s Saulnier has worked on dozens of projects — commercials, industrials, music videos and feature films. He’s a believer in the well-organized, well-tooled production. But Saulnier admits that by the time of Blue Ruin whatever heat he had from his debut feature, 2007’s Murder Party, had dissipated, and with no one ready to finance the new picture, he embraced a plan that involved free locations and a young, bare-bones, $100/day crew. When people questioned the approach, Saulnier told me he’d say, “I know how to do it right, and I want to do it right, but this one time we have to do it wrong.”
    12. Learn how to adapt.
    13. Generate good news.
    14. Think franchise and remake. (DISAGREE)
    15. A good script trumps everything.

ADDITION 2: SOME INSPIRATION

http://nofilmschool.com/2014/09/whats-foundation-filmmaking-heres-legendary-director-werner-herzogs-answer

ADDITION 3: WHY YOU CHOSE YOUR CREW AND SHOOTING STYLE :


-The truth is not connected with style!

ADDITION 4:  USEFUL LINKS: