CLASS OVERVIEW:

  1. RECAP ON CLASS 1
  2. FINAL FILM PRODUCTION OVERVIEW
  3. MARKETING PLANS – INTRODUCTION
  4. REVISION
  5. PRODUCER/FILMMAKER CASE STUDY
  6. SHORT FILM EXAMPLE -K.I.S.S
  7. DIGITAL DIALOGUE FILMS/FEEDBACK SESSION.
    3. MARKETING PLANS - THE INTRODUCTION. 

    movie-marketing-plan

    A. THINGS TO THINK ABOUT WHEN MAKING YOUR MARKETING PLAN!

    I want us to start thinking about marketing plans broadly as we start looking back at your digital dialogue films, so you see the missed opportunities and future opportunities that lie ahead for your THESIS films. There should not be any missed opportunities for your thesis films. Make your mistakes in the production workshops and in class exercises, but if you make mistakes in your thesis films, it’s not the end of the world. That’s what pick up shoots are for! KNOW THE IMPORTANCE OF SCHEDULING. 

    I. WHAT COMPRISES MY MARKETING PLAN?
    II. WHAT MAKES A GOOD LOGLINE?
    III. WHAT MAKES A GOOD DIRECTOR’S STATEMENT? WHAT DO I NEED FOR MY EPK (‘ELECTRONIC PRESS KIT’ OR HARD COPY PRESS KIT) WHAT DO I NEED TO INCLUDE IN MY TREATMENT? 
    IV. WHAT DO I NEED FOR SOCIAL MEDIA?
    V. DO I NEED A WEBSITE? TWITTER PAGE? INSTAGRAM?
    VI. WHAT ONLINE TOOLS DO I NEED TO TAKE ADVANTAGE OF TO MARKET MY WORK? We are going to discuss more of these later on.
    VII. WHERE WILL MY WORK BE SEEN? VIDEO ON DEMAND/FILM FESTIVAL/TV/CINEMA
    VIII. WHAT STILLS PHOTOGRAPHY / BEHIND THE SCENES VIDEO DO I NEED FOR A POSTER? OR A DELIVERABLE FOR FILM FESTIVALS?
    IX. TO CROWDFUND OR NOT TO CROWDFUND? WHAT DO I NEED TO GIVE MY AUDIENCE?

    http://www.filmmakingstuff.com/movie-marketing-plan-overview/

    B. TIPS FOR THE PERFECT LOG LINE FROM RAINDANCE:
    the-longline
    1.
    Include the protagonist, their goal and the antagonist
    2. NO CHARACTER NAMES. Keep it general. A chef, a policeman, unless a biopic!
    3. Use adjectives or descripters for your characters
    4. Clearly present their goal –
                    A troubled blind teenager tries to find a way to see.
             An alcoholic T-rex tries to find an AA meeting for dinosaurs.
    5. Describe the antagonist in a shorter way
    :

    1. A mute sous-chef wants must fight off an ambitious rival to win the position of Head Chef at her boss’s new restaurant

6. include the stakes, To save his reputation a secretly homosexual frat-boy must kiss 15 women by the end-of-semester party
7. Some scripts operate in a world with different rules to our own and require a brief setup to explain them, e.g. most science-fiction stories. Others have a protagonist whose personal or psychological history is crucial to the story and needs to be explained. Again, be brief.
8. 
Do not reveal the script’s supercool twist ending (THAT’s WHAT THE TREATMENT IS FOR)
9. Not telling the story, selling the story 🙂

FOR MORE DETAIL READ HERE:
http://www.raindance.org/10-tips-for-writing-loglines/

C. DIRECTOR’S STATEMENTS
I. a written proposal for the director’s vision of the film
II.  director’s statement is often asked for by producers to see if your vision is right for the job and then by investors or funding body’s to help them decide if your vision for the film is worth funding, so it is important that you get it right
III. Once your film is funded, shot and produced your director’s statement will change with it! (Good little blog article on this)
IV. You’ll want to cover a few things broadly:
—-WHAT IS YOUR STORY ABOUT?
—-WHAT INSPIRED YOU?
—- WHY ARE YOU MAKING THIS?
—-WHAT ARE THE THEMES?

EXAMPLE :

Advanced Director’s Statements Example– General Director’s Statement from Jazmin Jones, Co-Director of The Apollos I am interested in all forms of media. I believe that by blending different forms of art such as audio, visuals, storytelling, etc. you can create a more powerful piece than by using one art form alone. Each project I make is different, and I’ve found that each person takes something different out them. Our current culture, and my generation, is prone to listening to video media. I want to create films that have something positive to say. The last film I made (The Apollos) has been accepted in many film festivals. I feel honored by the acceptances and am very excited that the film will reach many audiences and share a story they may not have known before. Before I made this last film, I remember seeing a film, I Promise Africa. This film touched me, It challenged me. I remember it still. I feel passionate for film and the world I live in. My hope is to carry inspiration to others.

D. RESEARCH OTHER FILM’S MARKETING RELEASES/DIRECTOR’S STATEMENTS.

DRAMA: http://laurenceanywaysthemovie.com/home/
DOCUMENTARY: 
http://www.madeinla.com/
OBSERVATIONAL DOCUMENTARY: http://www.abc.net.au/tv/oasis/about/statements/director.htm

4. REVISION - BREAKING DOWN SCRIPTS.

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5. PRODUCER CASE STUDY - WERNER HERZOG

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——————————–READ WITH CAUTION————————

24 TIPS FROM WERNER HERZOG ON FILMMAKING –

Below is Herzog’s list of advice for filmmakers, found on the back of his latest book Werner Herzog – A Guide for the Perplexed. (Hat tip goes to Jason Kottke for bringing it to our attention.) Some maxims are pretty specific to the world of moviemaking – “That roll of unexposed celluloid you have in your hand might be the last in existence, so do something impressive with it.” Other points are just plain good lessons for life — “Always take the initiative,” “Learn to live with your mistakes.” Read along and you can almost hear Herzog’s malevolent Teutonic lilt.

1. Always take the initiative.
2. There is nothing wrong with spending a night in jail if it means getting the shot you need.
3. Send out all your dogs and one might return with prey.
4. Never wallow in your troubles; despair must be kept private and brief.
5. Learn to live with your mistakes.
6. Expand your knowledge and understanding of music and literature, old and modern.
7. That roll of unexposed celluloid you have in your hand might be the last in existence, so do something impressive with it.
8. There is never an excuse not to finish a film.
9. Carry bolt cutters everywhere.
10. Thwart institutional cowardice.
11. Ask for forgiveness, not permission.
12. Take your fate into your own hands.
13. Learn to read the inner essence of a landscape.
14. Ignite the fire within and explore unknown territory.
15. Walk straight ahead, never detour.
16. Manoeuvre and mislead, but always deliver.
17. Don’t be fearful of rejection.
18. Develop your own voice.
19. Day one is the point of no return.
20. A badge of honor is to fail a film theory class.
21. Chance is the lifeblood of cinema.
22. Guerrilla tactics are best.
23. Take revenge if need be.
24. Get used to the bear behind you.

http://www.openculture.com/2015/01/werner-herzogs-24-pieces-of-filmmaking-life-advice.html

PRODUCTION PROBLEM QUESTION-

SCENARIO: 
We are shooting a cafe scene at 12 Ultimo road in Sydney next to a busy highway with limited parking.
Times: 
We only have the location for 5 hours between 05:00- 10:00. We have 3 cast members and need to make the location look like a dinner scene and then a breakfast scene.
Cast: 
One actor gets a knife stuck in their arm in the dinner scene and has a cut on their hand in the breakfast scene.
Our lead actor is only available from 06:30 – 08:00.

How could we organise the shoot to be workable in 5 hours?

-Pre black out windows the night before and pre-light, try and get access to the location the night before.
– Shoot all other scenes without that cast member,
– Shoot that cast member over the shoulder with a stand in
– Shoot that cast member in singles.
– Shoot the dinner scene first with the continuity change
– have a production designer / art director and make decisions of what you need in the room for night and day

6. SHORT FILM EXAMPLES: 

K.I.S.S – KEEP IT SIMPLE:

While watching the digital dialogue films pay attention to the ways you have balanced the following:
DURATION
-Story – how much plot/story – what do we care about? Why do we care about them?
Genre
Technical elements – structure, character development, lighting
Audience – Who is this film for?
Pacing 
Where is this film going to be distributed

 

CLASS 2 ADDITIONAL RESOURCES 1:
-Planning your shoots with setups not shots! http://nofilmschool.com/2016/09/heres-why-you-should-never-shoot-shots-in-order
- Errol Morris in conversation with Werner Herzog - http://www.openculture.com/2011/06/errol_morris_and_werner_herzog_in_conversation.html
7. NEXT UP:

-MARKETING PLANS  IN DEPTH
– CASE STUDY, I’ll walk you through the steps I used in my marketing plan for one of my own films ‘REQUIRES REVIEW’ and show you my film festival breakdown.
-MORE THESIS FILM REVIEWING / SCRIPT REVIEW / MARKETING PLAN REVIEWS – this will all happen throughout our classes
-JB’S PRODUCING RULES OF THUMB – THE TIGHT ROPE OF CREATIVITY – BETWEEN SELF-DOUBT/FAILURE AND SUCCESS!
– As usual if there are any questions or you need advice on anything please get in touch via Canvas or our Facebook group! 🙂
Please come to class able to discuss the work of one Australian Film Producer!~ 

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